Herbology Hunt for May - extra information

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Cardamine group

Cuckoo Flower or Lady's Smock (Cardamine pratensis)

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Cardamine leaves

Cuckoo Flower or Lady's Smock (Cardamine pratensis)

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Cardamine single

Cuckoo Flower or Lady's Smock (Cardamine pratensis)

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Cardamine butterfly

Cuckoo Flower or Lady's Smock (Cardamine pratensis)

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Cadamine egg

Cuckoo Flower or Lady's Smock (Cardamine pratensis)

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Cuckoo Flower or Lady's Smock

Cuckoo Flower or Lady's Smock

Cuckoo Flower or Lady's Smock

Cuckoo Flower or Lady's Smock

Cuckoo Flower or Lady's Smock

Cuckoo Flower grows in damp grassland or even quite boggy places. The flowers are pink or very pale pink sometimes nearly white. The leaves have several thin leaflets opposite each other. It is a food plant for the Orange Tip butterfly's caterpillars. The female Orange Tip which has no orange on her wings, is visiting a flower in one of the photos above. She will lay a single egg on the plant. You can just about see a tiny bright orange egg just below the buds in the last photo.




Glechoma flower

Ground Ivy (Glechoma hederacea)

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Crataegus top

Hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna)

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Crataegus side

Hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna)

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Crataegus berries

Hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna)

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Ground Ivy

Hawthorn

Hawthorn

Hawthorn

Ground Ivy as its name suggest grows low to the ground an is often hidden in other vegetation or in grass. The dull blue flowers are found all along the flower stalk and it has hairy leaves. If you crush a leaf it smells quite strong.

Hawthorn is mostly found in hedges but if you let it grow will become a small tree. The flowers are white but cultivated ones for gardens can have pink flowers. In late summer the flowers will have died and bright red berries replace them.

Hyacinthoides non scripta whole

Bluebell (Hyacinthoides non-scripta)

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Hyacinthoides non scripta group

Bluebell (Hyacinthoides non-scripta)

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Hyacinthoides non scripta plant

Bluebell (Hyacinthoides non-scripta)

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Hyacinthoides non scripta close

Bluebell (Hyacinthoides non-scripta)

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Hybrid whole

Hybrid Bluebell (Hyacinthoides x massartiana)

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Bluebell

Bluebell

Bluebell

Bluebell

Hybrid Bluebell

Bluebells are the nation's favourite wild flower. They often grow in woods even in deep shade but will also grow in the open among bracken ferns. The flowers are all on one side of the flower stalk and are deep blue long and narrow. Bluebells are fragrant and a Bluebell wood smells beautiful on a sunny morning after rain.

Hybrid Bluebells have usually escaped from gardens and so are found near houses but not usually in deep shady woods. The flowers open out and are more bell shaped then the wild bluebell. They can be pale blue, pink or white. The flowers flower all round the flower stalk and not just on one side like the wild bluebell. They have become much more common recently and can be confused with real bluebells.




Fragaria group

Wild Strawberry (Fragaria vesca)

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Fragaria plant

Wild Strawberry (Fragaria vesca)

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Fragaria fruit

Wild Strawberry (Fragaria vesca)

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Fragaria close

Wild Strawberry (Fragaria vesca)

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Wild Strawberry

Wild Strawberry

Wild Strawberry

Wild Strawberry

Wild Strawberries have the same three lobed leaves as real strawberries but when the eventually produce fruit it is very much smaller than the ones you buy in shops. The white flowers have five petals and the plant itself is quite hairy.

Added on 24th January 2019

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