Herbology Hunt for February - extra information

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Tussilago whole

Coltsfoot (Tussilago farfara)

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Tussilago top

Coltsfoot (Tussilago farfara)

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Tussilago side

Coltsfoot (Tussilago farfara)

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Tussilago buds

Coltsfoot (Tussilago farfara)

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Coltsfoot

Coltsfoot

Coltsfoot

Coltsfoot

Coltsfoot flowers very early in springtime. It is unusual because the flowers come before the leaves and by the time the leaves are fully grown there are no flowers. It grows on waste ground, roadside verges and embankments and by railway lines but not very often in gardens. allotments and roadside verges.




Cymbalaria group

Ivy-leaved Toadflax (Cymbalaria muralis)

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Cymbalaria single

Ivy-leaved Toadflax (Cymbalaria muralis)

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Cymbalaria white

Ivy-leaved Toadflax (Cymbalaria muralis)

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Poa annua close

Annual Meadow-grass (Poa annua)

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Poa annua bud

Annual Meadow-grass (Poa annua)

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Poa annua very close

Annual Meadow-grass (Poa annua)

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Ivy-leaved Toadflax

Ivy-leaved Toadflax

Ivy-leaved Toadflax

Annual Meadow-grass

Annual Meadow-grass

Annual Meadow-grass

Ivy-leaved Toadflax is quite a common plant which grows most often in or on walls and large stones. It is nearly always a blue or purple colour with splashes of yellow but sometimes you can find a white one. It starts to flower in spring and carries on through the year even into winter if the weather is mild.

Annual Meadow-grass is a very common but quite small grass. It is often found as a weed in flower beds but will grow in grassy verges among the rest of the different kinds of grass. Because it is small it can grow in cracks between paving stones, at bottom or even on top of walls and anywhere which has been neglected and left alone.

Corylus whole

Hazel (Corylus avellana

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Corylus bud

Hazel (Corylus avellana

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Corylus close

Hazel (Corylus avellana

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Alnus close

Alder (Alnus glutinosa

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Corylus whole

Hazel (Corylus avellana

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Corylus whole

Hazel (Corylus avellana

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Hazel

Hazel

Hazel

Alder not Hazel

Hazel

Hazel

Hazel is a very small shrub which produces many catkins, sometimes hundreds, in early spring. The catkins are male flowers and release pollen. There are very few insects around in late winter and early spring and the pollen is carried to the tiny red female flowers by the wind. Late in the year the female flowers produce hazel nuts. Be careful not to confuse these pale yellow catkins with darker ones from the Alder tree.




Taraxacum group

Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale)

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Taraxacum close

Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale)

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Taraxacum whole

Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale)

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Dandelion

Dandelion

Dandelion

Dandelions are such a common sight in April that many of our roadside verges are covered with their yellow flowers. The leaves have jagged edges like a lion's tooth. After the flower has died a round seed head is produced know as a dandelion clock. The seeds can blow away on the wind and land anywhere.

Added on 22nd January 2019

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